Rangeland Woody Plant Research

Ecology, Management and Biomass Utilization

Dr. Jim Ansley, Professor & Project Leader
Dr. Mustafa Mirik, Associate Research Scientist
Brady Surber, Research Technician

INTRODUCTION

Woody plant or “brush” encroachment on grasslands and rangelands is a worldwide phenomenon.  Woody plants can have harmful effects on rangelands by reducing grass species cover and diversity which can lead to increased erosion and reduced forage production for livestock.  However, woody plants can often be beneficial for habitat for many wildlife species and are a major source of carbon sequestration in rangeland ecosystems. Knowledge and technology are needed to better understand these interactions and offer sustainable woody plant management solutions that accommodate overall ecosystem health and sustainable goods and services from these important lands.

Clockwise from upper left: Redberry juniper invasion in north Texas; Dr. Mirik in mesquite and cactus south Texas; Deer in mesquite cover; Summer fire in mesquite north Texas; Dr. Ansley in mixed brush in northern Argentina, near Santiago del Estero

Clockwise from upper left: Redberry juniper invasion in north Texas; Dr. Mirik in mesquite and cactus south Texas; Deer in mesquite cover; Summer fire in mesquite north Texas; Dr. Ansley in mixed brush in northern Argentina, near Santiago del Estero

 

RANGELAND WOODY PLANT RESEARCH GOALS:

Our overall aim is to develop sustainable options for mitigating the negative effects of woody plant invasion on grasslands and rangelands.  Specifically our goals are: 

LINKS
Ansley Publications
Image Gallery

RECENT EXTENSION ORIENTED PUBLICATIONS
Drivers of Vegetation Change in Texas (PDF)
Brush Sculpting Symposium (PDF)
Vertical Brush Sculpting (PDF)

CONTACT
Dr. Ansley: 1-940-552-9941 ext 234; jansley@ag.tamu.edu
Dr. Mirik: 1-940-552-9941 ext 238; mmirik@ag.tamu.edu
Mr. Brady Surber:  1-940-552-9940 ext 214: bsurber@ag.tamu.edu

 

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